Gilder Lehrman Center Announces 2017-2018 Fellowships

February 14, 2017

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, part of the MacMillan Center at Yale University, is pleased to announce that it is accepting applications for the following fellowships.

The GLC supports three types of postdoctoral and faculty fellowships that advance the study of slavery, its role in the creation of the modern world, and its legacies. They are: the Postdoctoral and Faculty Fellowships, the annual Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellowships, and a new Digital Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship. 

The Postdoctoral and Faculty Fellowships, Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellowships, and Digital Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship are in-residence positions. During their time in New Haven, fellows have access to Yale University libraries and resources, office space at the Gilder Lehrman Center, give a public lecture, and participate in the intellectual life at the Center. 

The deadline for applications for the 2017-2018 fellowships will be March 13, 2017. For further information regarding specific fellowships and the application process see the Gilder Lehrman Center website: http://glc.yale.edu/fellowships

Gilder Lehrman Center One-month and Four-month Postdoctoral and Faculty Fellowships
LOCATION: New Haven, CT
APPLY HERE: https://apply.interfolio.com/40548
CLOSES: Mar 13, 2017 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time (GMT-5 hours) 

Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellowships in 2017-2018
LOCATION: New Haven, CT
APPLY HERE: https://apply.interfolio.com/40549
CLOSES: Mar 13, 2017 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time (GMT-5 hours) 

Digital Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2017-2018 [NEW]
LOCATION: New Haven, CT
APPLY HERE: https://apply.interfolio.com/40546
CLOSES: Mar 13, 2017 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time (GMT-5 hours)

About the Gilder Lehrman Center
The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, part of the MacMillan Center at Yale University, strives to make a vital contribution to the understanding of slavery and its role in the development of the modern world. While the Center’s primary focus has been on scholarly research, it also seeks to bridge the divide between scholarship and public knowledge by opening channels of communication between the scholarly community and the wider public.